English 9
English 9th grade coursework will consist of extensive study in the areas of grammar, usage and mechanics. Students will be taught to analyze and interpret text. They will learn to write logically by developing basic writing skills in sentence structure, topic development, organization of paragraphs and draft revision using the MLA guidelines. Students will be introduced to the areas of analytical and critical writing. In addition, students will use critical thinking, reasoning and inference skills during class discussion of various works of literature.

English 10
English 10th grade coursework is language and literature based, designed to reinforce students' skills in writing through the study of grammar, usage and mechanics, along with the development of critical thinking skills through writing, class discussions, thesis paragraphs, essays and a formal research paper. In the study of literature, students will be exposed to many different cultures through various readings of poetry, drama, fiction, folklore and essays.

English 11
English 11th grade coursework includes the study of literature, grammar and mechanics, composition, vocabulary, language and communication skills. The literature will include a survey of American literature and classic myths. Special emphasis will be given to students' individual academic deficiencies and needs.

English 12
The objectives of English 12 include the study of literature, grammar and mechanics, composition, vocabulary, language and communication skills. The literature will include a survey of British literature; from the Anglo Saxon period forward and world classics. Special emphasis will be given to students' individual academic deficiencies and needs.

Creative Writing
The creative writing course can be seen as an introduction to the techniques of creating poetry, fiction and creative non-fiction, identifying and exploring traditional and non-traditional literary forms and genres while working on individual creative writing projects.

AP Literature and Composition
AP Literature and Composition attempts to discuss literature at a deeper, more analytical level than the standard high school curriculum requires. Students enrolled in the course are expected to read extensively outside of class and discuss assigned readings in a manner fitting an introductory college course. Students are expected to exercise their writing skills and contribute meaningfully to the classroom environment. Throughout the course, students will write effectively for multiple audiences and purposes, with specific attention to developing a wide-ranging vocabulary, a variety of sentence structures, logical organization, a balance of generalization with specific textual evidence and effective use of rhetoric (College Board, 2010). Students will offer and receive critical feedback, followed by a successful revision of written work. Students will read across genres for basic understanding as well as deeper significance and literary technique. Thematic units may incorporate texts by F. Scott Fitzgerald, Tennessee Williams, Tim O’Brien, Joseph Conrad, William Shakespeare, Tom Stoppard, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Zora Neale Hurston and selected poets.

AP Language and Composition
AP Language and Composition attempts to examine and practice effective use of language at a deeper, more analytical level than the standard high school curriculum requires. Students enrolled in AP Language and Composition are expected to read extensively outside of class and discuss assigned readings in a manner fitting an introductory college course; as well, the student will be expected to exercise effective writing skills and contribute meaningfully to the classroom environment. Throughout the course, students will write effectively for multiple audiences and purposes, with specific attention to developing a wide-ranging vocabulary, a variety of sentence structures, logical organization, a balance of generalization with specific textual evidence and effective use of rhetoric (College Board, 2010). Students will offer and receive critical feedback, followed by a successful revision of written work. Thematic units may incorporate 1) argument, including a study of political speeches and documents, both filmed and in print; 2) analysis of visual and written arguments, including selected essays, peer writing and visual advertisements; 3) formal research, with an emphasis on identifying and citing credible primary and secondary sources; and 4) creative nonfiction, with an emphasis on identifying and incorporating effective writing techniques in a literary context.